Lilies and violets, or, Thoughts in prose and verse, on the true graces of ... By Rosalie Bell

Lilies and violets, or, Thoughts in prose and verse, on the true graces of ...
By Rosalie Bell

"WHAT a pity," said a little boy to his father, as they walked through the garden, " that the rose, after blooming, does not produce fruit and thus return a thank-offering in Summer, for the lovely season of its Spring-life. Now, it is called the flower of innocence and joy; then, it would be also the... emblem of gratitude."

The father answered: "Does it not offer all its loveliness to beautify the Spring; and, for the dew and light which it receives from above, does it not fill the air with its delicate fragrance ? Thus, like gratitude, bestowing a charm unseen, which enhances every other good. Created for the Spring, it dies with the Spring; but its withered leaves retain a' portion of its sweet fragrance; so in the heart of innocence does gratitude abide, after the kind deed, which called forth, is forgotten in our breasts."