Fragrance Quote for January 6th, 2012 from Seas and lands By Sir Edwin Arnold

Even about the boiling of the water there is orthodox tradition, there is solemnity, I had almost said there is religion. The sumi in the brazier must be piled up in the outline of a glowing Fuji-San. The kettle of beaten iron must have no touch of modern vulgarity in its shape, the water must be drawn from the purest source, and—at the moment of use—in the third state of boiling. The first state is known by its low murmuring, and the appear ance on the surface of the large slow bubbies distinguished as "fish eyes," gyo-moku; the second is when steam comes with quickly rising foam; the third is when the steam disappears in a tranquil, steady simmer, and the fluid is now "honourable old hot water." This is the propitious moment for the admixture, which being compounded appears in the guise of a light-green frothy compound, delicately fragrant and invigoratingly hot, contained in the antique cup, which, neatly folded in a fair cloth, should be handed now to the principal guest. Drinking reverently from it, he should tenderly wipe the rim at the spot where he has quaffed, but the next guest must drink at the very same place, for such is the "Kiss of brotherhood," in harmonv with the friendly inspirations of this ceremony. The last guest must be heedful to drain the bowl to its dregs; then he passes it round to be examined, criticised, and made the subject of pleasant talk about the old days, the canons of true art in pottery, or any other topic lightly arising from the graceful moment, as the tender fragrance of the tea leaf wafts itself about the air of the little spotless chamber and among the kneeling, happy, tranquil companions of the occasion.
Fragrance Quote for January 6th, 2012 from Seas and lands By Sir Edwin Arnold