Fragrance Quote for January 18th, 2012 from A walk in Hellas: or, The old in the new, Volumes 1-2 By Denton Jaques Snider

Such is Delium with its two jarring notes, an ancient and a modern one, both indicating the deep-seated discordant throes of their respective epochs. But let us flee from these horrible dissonances and follow the donkeys into some harmonious spot; they are now passing over a line of low hills covered with brushwood. Even among the brambles there is the interest of a delightful antiquity, for all of these bushes and plants have been fragrantly preserved in classical poetry. Here is the arbute known to readers of Theocritus and Virgil with its bright red berry resembling the strawberry in look but not in taste; sometimes it is called the strawberry tree. The schinos or wild mastic — not the aromatic mastic of Chios so much used in the East for its fragrance — is here with its ancient name still, just as it was uttered by the Sicilian shepherd; its leaves are employed for tanning, according to my informant, one of the new-comers. Pine grows in abundance, often chipped for its resinous ooze to put into the recinato; a species of scrub-oak is very common — yet there are no tall trees making a forest. One of my companions tells me the names and uses of the various shrubs ; to my special delight he points out the wild olive, on which the tame one is grafted to produce the hardy tree. Who can forget that it was one of the trees which furnished cover to Ulysses, asleep, after his shipwreck near the Phaeacian isle, and from whose concealment he came forth to greet fair Nausicaa? So every bush, every flower has, besides its native virtues, the delicious fragrance of old Greek poetry which rises up like incense from these green hills.
Fragrance Quote for January 18th, 2012 from A walk in Hellas: or, The old in the new, Volumes 1-2 By Denton Jaques Snider