Fragrance Quote for January 13th , 2012 from Letters from Catalonia and other parts of Spain, Volume 2 By Rowland Thirlmere

The train moved away from Garrago; the steam from the engine rising straight up into the clear evening sky, in great curly masses that contrasted whitely against the purple hills. A fainter orangeflower perfume was now perceptible, but I myself could not detect any difference between this fragrance and that to which I had become accustomed. The nostrils of these Spaniards, however,—men who lived on the land,—were keen to mark the delicate nuance. "Mandarinos!" they exclaimed; the fields hereabouts being full of trees of the mandarin orange, whose scent is not so strong as that of the ordinary azahar....

Meanwhile, we moved in a bath of perfume. Everywhere and always we inhaled the odour of the azahar —the special scent of the Moorish kingdoms of the South. In the booking-office—refusing to be dominated by the scent of cigarette smoke—on the platforms, in the roadway, and in the railway-carriage; always and everywhere the fragrance of the orange flower! A curious peacefulness seemed to have fallen upon the people—a drowsy feeling of ineffable content, like that which possessed the hearts of those who dwelt where it was always afternoon.
Letters from Catalonia and other parts of Spain, Volume 2
By Rowland Thirlmere