Fragrant Quotation for December 26th, 2011 from Spring Comes to the Desert

A walk out in the desert brings to light more of the spring's gifts. This vast expanse of flatness, sprinkled with the green and gray of creosote and sage, is not only an abiding-place for horned toads and lizards, "side-winders," jack-rabbits, and coyotes; scattered among the typical desert growth are flowers of unexpected delicacy and fragrance. From one spot you can see a dozen varieties of bloom — many yellow, daisy-like blossoms ; delicate blue, pink-tinged larkspur; low bushes covered with fragrant greenish-white spikes, reminding one of sweet alyssum; the silky, flaunting magenta of the prickly pear; bunches of tiny pink stars; soft, fluffy yellow dandelions, the center petals tipped with red ; gorgeous masses of pinkish-lilac sand-verbenas, spreading out in a wide circle long, trailing stems, which every few inches put forth smaller-stemmed bunches of delicate bloom, with an elusive, fascinating fragrance; and, best of all, the wonderful sand-lilies. The long stalk, growing up straight a foot or two, bears sometimes three dozen buds which open into white lilies, heavy with fragrance. It is astonishing to come unexpectedly upon this symbol of Easter. One feels as if a miracle had taken place. Up the slope are spikes of creamy yucca-bells, the tall stalks higher than a man's head; and on the hills beyond the river are beautiful large asters, with a hint of lavender in their feathery blue petals. A few miles to the east grow in profusion the thistle poppies—large white blossoms of remarkable beauty—sisters to the Matilija poppy. The creosote-bush is yellow with bloom; the various sages are tipped with blue, lavender, or purple ; the mesquite is strung with feathery yellow catkins ; each straight stalk of the arrow-weed is crowned with a bit of lavender; in fact, every shrub of the desert has a touch of color.
Fragrant Quotation for December 26th, 2011 from Spring Comes to the Desert