Elegance of Daisies by Algernon Blackwood

Elegance of Daisies by Algernon Blackwood

"No flowers lie closer to the soil, or bring the smell of earth more sweetly to the mind; upon the lips and cheeks they are soft as a kitten's fur, and lie against the skin closer than tired eyelids. They are the common people of the flower world, yet have, in virtue of that fact, the beauty and simplicity of the common people. They own a subdued and unostentatious strength, are humble and ignored, are walked upon, unnoticed, rarely thought about, and never praised; they are cut off in early youth by mowing machines; yet their pain in fading is unreported, their little sufferings unsung. They cling to earth, and never aspire to climb, but they hold the sweetest dew, and nurse the tiniest little winds, imaginable. Their patience is divine. They are proud to be the carpet for all walking, running things, and in their universal service is their strength. The rain stays longer with them than with grander flowers, and the best sunlight goes to sleep among them in great pools of fragrant and delicious heat. . . . They know, it is said, the thoughts of Painted Ladies and Clouded Brimstones, as well as the intentions of the disappearing Golden Flies; why wind often runs close to the ground when the tree-tops are without a single breath; but, also, they know what is going on below the surface. They live, moreover, in every country of the globe, and their system of intercommunication is so perfect that even birds and flying things can learn from it. They prove their breeding by their perfect taste in dress, the well-bred ever being inconspicuous; and their simplicity conceals enormous, undecipherable wonder. One Daisy out of doors is worth a hundred shelves of text-books in the house. . . . Daisies, in a word, are—Daisies."