TUBEROSES AT CEREMONIES IN INDIA.



TUBEROSES AT CEREMONIES IN INDIA.

We have frequently had applications for Tuberoses in a variety of colors, but have never been able to gratify the demand. From the following account it appears that similar ideas are entertained in other countries, but our acquaintance with press reporters is intimate enough to allow us to make a proper allowance for some statements: "In a published letter from India is described the laying of a corner stone at Kolhapur, by Sir Rich Ard Temple, Governor of Bombay. The following is an extract: 'After the speech was finished, the Rajah, from a little golden cup and saucer containing oil of sandalwood, with a golden ladle, put a drop of oil on the handkerchiefs of the Governor, Colonel Schneider, and one or two others. He then sprinkled a little perfume on the handkerchiefs from a silver bottle. Next were brought to him immense garlands of flowers, with which he decorated the Governor and Colonel Schneider. The Governor's garland was made of Tuberoses and was two inches in diameter, and on being placed around his neck reached down to his waist. The Tuberoses were held together by means of gold thread. There were probably not less than from 1,000 to 1,500 flowers in the garland. The garland of Colonel Schneider was made of pink and red Tuberoses and was similar to the Governor's. The next operation was the placing of bracelets, made of full-blown Roses, on the wrists of the two worthies named. Next, on golden salvers, the Rajah served them with pan supari (betel-nut and leaf), cloves, mace, almonds, etc., done up in goldleaf. It is usual on such occasions for the guests simply to touch the salver, which is then passed back to the attendants, who carry it away. But the Governor, I believe, took one package of pan supari. After this ceremony the Karubhari went through the same performance with each of the European guests and native chiefs, with the exception that our garlands were not as fine, and the pan supari and spices were served to us on silver salvers. No garlands of Tuberoses were bestowed on the native chiefs. After this, the pan supari and spices were passed around to the natives, but in their cases the morsels were not covered with goldleaf. Bouquets were given to all the guests, and the native chiefs received the oil of sandal and perfumery on their handkerchiefs. One can form an idea of the great quantity of Tuberoses used when I say that in my garland alone there were 150, besides several pink Roses, and there were many in the bouquets, which were bountifully scattered.'"

It is safe to assume that the pink and red flowers here mentioned as Tuberoses were something else, and our enquirer is, no doubt, of the same opinion, but desires to know the probability of the production of a variety with colored flowers. Careful selection through a number of generations of plants has produced some wonderful results, and we have a right to expect much from it in the future. That a colored Tuberose should ultimately be obtained is, perhaps, not impossible, and the pink tinge the buds have before opening indicates that this result is even probable.