Sage(Salvia officinalis) essential oil/Bulgaria organic




Images of Sage/Salvia officinalis

Olfactory Properties of Sage(Salvia officinalis) essential oil/Organic Hungary
Sage oil is a pale yellow to white mobile liquid displaying a fresh, sharp, green-herbaceous, slightly punguent spicy bouquet. In the dry out phase the bouquet takes on a delicate spicy, sweet herbaceous dimension which is very delightful.

Blends well with amyris eo; anise star eo and co2; aromoise eo; basil eo, co2 and abs; bay leaf eo and abs; benzoin resinoid and abs; bergamot eo; birch sweet eo; bois de rose eo; black currant abs; cajuput eo; caraway seed eo and co2; cardamon eo, co2 and abs; cascarilla eo; cassia bark eo and co2; cedarleaf oils; cedarwood oils and abs; chamomile eo's, co2's and abs;cistus eo and abs; clary sage eo and abs; clove bud eo, co2 and abs; coriander seed eo and co2; davan eo, co2 and abs; eucalyptus oils and abs; fennel seed eo and co2; fir balsam eo and abs; frankincense eo, co2 and abs; guaiacwood eo; gurjun balsam eo; hay absolute; helichrysum eo and abs; hyssop eo and co2; hops eo and co2; juniperberry eo, co2 and abs; labdanum eo and abs; lavender eo, co2 and abs; lavindin eo and abs; lavender spike eo; lavender seville abs; mace eo and co2; marjoram eo and co2; musk black attar; myrrh eo, co2 and abs; niaouli eo; nutmeg eo, co2 and abs; patchouli eo, co2 and abs; pepper black eo and co2; pepper pink eo and co2; pennyroyal eo; petitgrain oils; popular bud eo and abs; rosemary eo, co2 and abs; spruce eo and abs; stryax eo and abs; tansy, blue eo; tarragon eo and abs; thyme eo, co2 and abs; tonka bean abs; vanilla abs and co2; yarrow eo; wintergreen eo

In perfumery can be used very effectively in sacred perfumes, culinary creations, fougeres, chypres, colognes, forest notes, herbal bouquets, literary perfumes, geographical perfumes

Sage in Literature

And even yet, in the midst of a luxury and a comfort which anticipated every want and gratified every taste, he often looked longingly back upon the life he had left, until his nose inhaled again the scent of the sage-brush and his eyes smarted with alkali dust.
The Bread-winners, by John Hay

The coyote voices lifted to him
and Breed read them as the call of kind; for although he had spent the
past ten months with the wolf tribe of his father his first friendships
had been formed among his mother's people on the open range. The acrid
spice of the sage drifted to his nostrils and combined with the coyote
voices to fill him with a homesick urge to revisit the land of his
birth.
The Yellow Horde, by Hal G. Evarts

It was only a slight breeze, but it came directly against the lurking
three; and moreover the scent of the sage was particularly keen at this
time of the day, and quite sufficient to blur the scent of man even in
the keen nostrils of Black Bart. Only for a second or so he stood there
sniffing the wind, a huge animal, larger than any wolf the three had
ever seen; his face wise in a certain bear-like fashion from the three
gray marks in the center of his forehead. Now he trotted ahead, and the
stallion broke into a gallop behind.
The Seventh Man, by Max Brand

The road was almost invisible, the plain unsubstantial, though the far-off mountain ranges showed plainly cut, with a curious trick of seeming always to shift back as the observer advanced. Little winds blew in their faces, cool and sweet from the desert, charged with spice of sage.
Rimrock Trail, by J. Allan Dunn

They drove out of the sleepy little village on which had been grafted showy samples of the Company's progress. The day was beautiful with sunshine, with the mellow calls of meadow larks, with warmth and sweet odours. As the surrey took its zigzag way through the brush, as the quail paced away to right and left, as the delicate aroma of the sage rose to his nostrils, Bob began to be very glad he had come. Here and there the brush had been cleared, small shacks built, fences of wire strung, and the land ploughed over. At such places the surrey paused while Selwyn held forth to his two stolid "prospects" on how long these newcomers had been there and how well they were getting on. The country rose in a gradual slope to the slate-blue mountains. Ditches ran here and there. Everywhere were small square stakes painted white, indicating the boundaries of tracts yet unsold.
The Rules of the Game, by Stewart Edward White

A thin coating of frost crackled on his bed when he awakened; and out from under the shelter of the cedar all the ground was hoar-white. As he slipped from his blankets the same strong smell of black sage and juniper smote him, almost like a blow. His nostrils seemed glued together by some rich piny pitch; and when he opened his lips to breathe a sudden pain, as of a knife-thrust, pierced his lungs.
The Heritage of the Desert, by Zane Grey

When we moved forward once more, it was along paths of short zigzags
between cliffs, so that our procession was constantly broken into small
pieces. At length we lost sight of the Ghor and the Dead Sea; and after
some time traversing miles of red and white cistus, red everlasting, and
fragrant thyme and sage, with occasional terebinth-trees festooned with
honeysuckle, we came upon a district covered with millions, or billions,
or probably trillions, of locusts, not fully grown, and only taking short
flights; but they greatly annoyed our horses. My choice Arab, being at
that time ridden by my servant, fairly bolted away with fright for a
considerable distance.
Byeways in Palestine, by James Finn

"It's a fairy tale, and you won't believe it—of a Blount," was the laughing reply. "I left Boston Monday, and should have reached the capital last night. But my train was laid out by a yard wreck at Twin Buttes just before dark, and I left it and took to the hills—horseback. Don't ask me why I did such a thing as that; I can only say that the smell of the sage-brush got into my blood and I simply had to do it."
The Honorable Senator Sage-Brush, by Francis Lynde
"I never will," she stated positively. "It's always been my home. I've been away and had a good time; three winters in school and enjoying every second; but there always comes a time when I'm sick to get back, when I know I can't stay away from the Three Bar, when I want to smell the sage and throw my leg across a horse—and ride!"

"I know, Billie," he said softly. "I was raised here, up until I was eight. My feeling is likely less acute than yours but I've always hankered to get back to where the sage and pine trees run together. I mentioned a while back that I was tied up peculiar and stood to lose considerable if I failed to put in two years out here—which wouldn't have been of any particular consequence only that I found out that the Three Bar was going under unless some one put a stop to what's going on. I'll pull it out of the hole, maybe, and hand it back to you."
The Settling of the Sage, by Hal G. Evarts

The sunshine wrapped itself in its old fine gilded gossamer
haze and drowsed upon the verdant slopes; the green jewelled "Juny-bugs"
whirred in the soft air; the mould was as richly brown as in Joel
Quimbey's own enclosure; the flag-lilies bloomed beside the onion bed;
and the woolly green leaves of the sage wore their old delicate tint and
gave out a familiar odor.
His "Day In Court", by
Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)


Links to Sage/Saliva officinalis
Wikipedia article on Sage
Whats Cooking America
Origins of Sage
Plants for a Future
Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Salvia officinalis L. Oil from Two Culture Sites in Tunisia
Encyclopedia of food and color additives, Volume 3 By George A. Burdoc