Orris root(Iris pallida) CO2 select extract/Albania



Olfactory Properties of Orris Root(Iris pallida) CO2 Select Extract/Albania

Even though the Orris root co2 is considered a select extract, it is a waxy solid beige mass at room temperature that with gentle heat becomes a flowable transparent liquid at which point it can be blended with carrier oils etc and will remain in its liquid state.
The co2 extract displays a delicate, warm, sweet-violet floral, precious woods-rooty, powdery odor with a lovely fruity undertone with good tenacity and radiant power.

Blends well with aglaia odorata abs; ambrette seed abs, co2 and eo; amyris wood eo; angelica root eo, co2 and abs; cedarwood oils; citrus oils; beeswax abs; benzoin abs; bois de rose/rosewood eo; boronia abs; carrot seed eo, co2 and abs; cassie abs; clary sage eo and abs; cocoa co2 and abs; currant black abs and co2; coconut abs; davana eo, co2 and abs; fir balsam abs; geranium eo, co2 and abs; guiacwood eo; juniberry eo, co2 and abs; mango leaf abs; nagarmotha eo and co2; mimosa abs; musk black attar; neroli eo; oakmoss abs; osmanthus abs; pepper black eo, co2 and abs; patchouli eo, co2 and abs; peru balsam eo and abs; rose otto and abs; sandalwood eo, co2 and abs; tonka bean abs; vanilla co2 and abs; vetiver eo, co2 and abs; violet leaf abs; ylang eo, co2 and abs

In natural perfumery is used in amber bases chypre, fougere; forest bases, oriental accords, colognes, in natural re-creations of freesia, orchid, cyclamen, violet, lilac perfumes


Orris in Literature

Although I had spent several springs in the
neighbourhood of Florence, this was my first
upon that side of the country, and I was there-
fore unaware that it was the district where
most of the irises for the famous Florentine
orris root was grown. Had I known this, I
should have been prepared and expectant ; as
it was I stood breathless, silent, before so won-
derful a sight.

The irises were all in flower. Up the long
slopes and in the rounded hollows of the hills
they stood in millions, close-growing ; a carpet
of pale purple ; an amethystine sea from which
the olive-trees raised their silver foliage and
twisted, moss-grown trunks. Erect upon its
tall stalk each flower stood majestic, springing
proudly from its sword-like leaves.

They broke in purple waves against the very
walls of the little white farmhouses, and, as
the breeze passed over them, it stirred their
surface as the wind might ruffle the surface of
a lake. They crept into the copses among the
young oak-trees. The clusters of stone pines
on their straight, slender stems, the groups of
cypresses like sombre plumes, the thickets of
bay and myrtle breaking the even flow of them,
were but as rocks against which the water
lapped. Even the patches of corn, usually
supreme in a landscape, seemed as a mere em-
broidery upon this royal robe of purple, or
as "the Islands of the Blessed" set in an
enchanted sea.

It was a fit hour for such a vision, for all
this loveliness lay outstretched beneath a pale
blue sky, in the clear quiet air of early morn-
ing. This mystical world of lilac and pale
silver, beautiful at any time, possessed a more
indescribable charm, a more ethereal and ap-
pealing loveliness, in the austere light of the
unsullied day.
Tuscan feasts and Tuscan friends‎
Dorothy Nevile Lees


"Just think," the canon would say to Birotteau, "that for twelve
consecutive years nothing has ever been amiss,--linen in perfect
order, bands, albs, surplices; I find everything in its place, always
in sufficient quantity, and smelling of orris-root.
The Vicar of Tours, by Honore de Balzac

There was a violent ring at the bell, a jarring of wheels on the
asphalt. The door flew open and the prettiest little woman imaginable,
all fluffy ends and scarlet flowers and orris scent, rushed toward him.
In The Valley Of The Shadow, by Josephine Daskam

As each article received its last touch, and came from the laundry white
and immaculate, it was folded to perfection, tied with a narrow blue or
pale rose-colored ribbon, and laid aside in a sacred receptacle known as
"The Wedding Bureau." The handkerchiefs, grouped in dozens, were strewn
with dried violets and rose-leaves to make them sweet. Lavender-bags and
sachets of orris lay among the linen; and perfumes as of Araby were
discernible whenever a drawer in the bureau was pulled out.
Clover, by Susan Coolidge, Illustrated by
Jessie McDermot


Miss Susan Ingram, an old friend of Poe, and one of the party at Old
Point, tells of a visit he made at her home in Norfolk following the
day at Point Comfort. Noting the odor of orris root, he said that he
liked it because it recalled to him his boyhood, when his adopted
mother kept orris root in her bureau drawers, and whenever they were
opened the fragrance would fill the room.
Literary Hearthstones of Dixie
by La Salle Corbell Pickett

Or perhaps it is an old bow-legged high-boy—its club-feet slippered on easy rollers—the kind with deep drawers kept awake by rattling brass handles, its outside veneer so highly polished that you are quite sure it must have been brought up in some distinguished family. The scent of old lavender and spiced rose leaves, and a stick or two of white orris root, haunt this relic: my lady's laces must be kept fresh, and so must my lady's long white mitts—they reach from her dainty knuckles quite to her elbow. And so must her cobwebbed silk stockings and the filmy kerchief she folds across her bosom:
The Little Gray Lady, by F. Hopkinson Smith

And it was impossible to avoid noticing that the opening of the carved
oaken presses, smelling sweet and benignly of orris root and lavender,
acted on John almost as a physical pleasure, and also that his hands
seemed nervous with delight as he unfolded the jewelled embroideries,
and smoothed out the fine linen of the under vestments; and his voice,
too, seemed to gain a sharp tenderness and emotive force, as he told how
these were the gold vestments worn by the bishop, and only on certain
great feast-days, and that these were the white vestments worn on days
especially commemorative of the Virgin. The consideration of the
censers, candlesticks, chalices, and albs took some time, and John was a
little aggressive in his explanation of Catholic ceremonial, and its
grace and comeliness compared with the stiffness and materialism of the
Protestant service
A Mere Accident, by George Moore

"Why no--not at all," said my Mother. "Why--Why I think it's rather
interesting! Why--Why--Though I must admit," she laughed out suddenly,
"that I never quite thought of things in just that way before!" She
looked out the window. She looked in the fire-place. She looked at my
Father. She looked at Carol. She looked at me. She began to clap her
hands. "I've got it!" she said. "I know what I'd choose! A White Iris!
In all the world there's no perfume that can compare with the perfume of
a White Iris!--Orris root they call it. Orris--"

"Humph! What's the matter with Tulips?" said my Father.

"Oh but Tulips don't have any smell at all," said my Mother. "Except
just the nice earthy smell of Spring winds and Spring rains and Spring
sunbeams!--Oh of course they _look_ as though they were going to smell
tremendously sweet!" she acknowledged very politely. "But they're just
so busy being _gay_ I suppose that--"
Fairy Prince and Other Stories, by
Eleanor Hallowell Abbott


Orris/Iris pallida/Iris florentina/Iris germanica Links

Cultivation of Orris with images
Orris cultivation in Italy
King's American dispensatory, Volume 2 By John King
Current topics in flavours and fragrances: towards a new millennium of discovery By Karl A. D. Swift
The new perfume handbook By Nigel Groom
A modern herbal: By Maud Grieve
Odorographia: Volume 1 By John Charles Sawer