Ruh Gulab/Rose otto(Rosa damascena) essential oil/Himalayas, India organic




Images of Rosa damascena
Roses in India


Ruh Gulab/Rose otto(Rosa damascena) essential oil/Himalayas, India organic
The distilled essence of organically grown Rosa damascena flowers in the Himalayan mountains of India is a rare and precious aromatic treat. Currently only a few innovative farmers are engaged in growing in distilling Rosa damascena in several remote areas but the oil that they produce is of a remarkably lovely quality.
This precious essential rose oil, like Rosa damascena otto distilled in several other countries like Bulgaria, South Africa and Turkey, is a clear, transparent liquid when temperatures are warmer but as soon as cooler temperatures prevail becomes a solid or semi solid waxy mass due to the presence of steroptenes-floral waxes that come over in the process of distillation. These floral waxes play in an important role in stablizing the oil and giving it good radiant strength over a long period of time. The are a natural fixative for the highly volatile aromatic constituents of the oil.
The essential oil displays an incredibly rich, ethereal, sweet, deep, warm, full floral bouquet with a slightly spicy-honeyed undertone. As it ages the harmony of the different aromatic molecules that compose the total oil become more and more harmonious and integrated creating an aura of perfect floral beauty.
The radiation of Ruh Gulab is unique an surprising. It grows from a quiet aromatic center and spreads silently into the atmosphere but suddenly one is engulfed in its magnetic sphere. If one goes out of the room in which a small dr0p of oil is suffusing itself in to the environment and then returns after a few minutes then they will receive a unique type of invisible aromatic bath that it is immensely refreshing and satisfying.

Rose otto can be used with a great variety of natural aromatics including agarwood/oud eo and co2; amberi attar; ambrette seed eo, co2 and abs; auraucaria eo; bakul attar; beeswax absolute, benzoin abs; bois de rose/rosewood eo; boronia abs; citrus oils; carnation abs; cassie abs; clary sage eo and abs; clove bud eo, co2 and abs; fir balsam abs; frangipani abs; frankincense eo, co2 and abs;geranium eo and abs; hay abs; guaicwood eo; hennaflower attar; jasmine abs(grandiflorum, auriculatum and sambac); jonquil abs; lavender eo, co2 and abs; lavindin eo and abs; mimosa abs; musk, black attar; nagarmotha eo and co2; narcissus abs; neroli eo; night queen abs and attar; oakmoss abs; opoponax eo and abs; orange blossom abs; osmanthus abs; patchouli eo, co2 and abs rose oils and abs(damascena, bourbonia, centifolia); ruh kewda and kewda attar; saffron attar and co2; sandalwood eo, co2 and abs; shamama attar; siamwood eo; styrax eo and abs; tonka bean abs; tuberose attar and abs; vanilla abs; vetiver eo, co2 and abs;violet leaf abs; ylang eo, co2 and abs

In perfumery ruh gulab/rose otto is used in Oriental bouquets, high class colognes, high class floral perfumes, literary perfumes, culinary creations, chypres, sacred perfumes, mythological creations

Rosa damascena/Damask Rose in Literature

As they went out of the door, Fanny bent her head down to smell of a
beautiful damask rose that was blooming on a bush near the house. They
walked along without seeing Jack, but he saw them. When they were half
way through the orchard, he came running up behind them, and reaching
out his hand, and touching Fanny, said:

"Won't you take this rose." She turned around, and saw that he had
picked for her the very rose that she had admired so much, and as she
took it from him, he whispered,

"I hope you don't think that I meant to hurt you this noon, when I
threw that stone--I wouldn't hurt you for the world. I only threw it
to make you look around.
of Frank and Fanny, by Mrs. Clara Moreton

If she had been pretty before, she became now ten times prettier; her lovely eyes grew larger with laughter and wonder and joy; her light feet almost danced; her color was like that of a damask rose. Each day brought new innocent happiness to her. When José came home from his work at night, she sat by his side and asked him a thousand questions. Had he seen the palace—had he seen the king or the queen—what were the people doing—were the public gardens beautiful?
The Pretty Sister Of José, by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Over all went the sunbeams, rollicking and playing; and through all went
Hildegarde, her heart filled with a new delight, feeling as if she had
never lived before. She talked to the flowers. She bent and kissed the
damask rose, which was too beautiful to pluck. She put her cheek against
a lily's satin-silver petals, and started when an angry bee flew out and
buzzed against her nose. But where were the currant-bushes? Ah! there
they were,--a row of stout green bushes, forming a hedge at the bottom
of the garden.
Queen Hildegarde, by Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

Anne went outdoors presently to look around the dear old place. 'Lewis
Hall,' a roomy frame-house built before the Revolution, was on a hill
which sloped gently toward the corn-fields and meadows that bordered the
lazy river beyond which rose the bluffs of Buckingham. Back of the
house, a level space was laid out in a formal garden. The boxwood,
brought from England when that was the mother country, met across the
turf walks. Long-neglected flowers--damask and cabbage roses, zinnias,
cock's-comb, hollyhocks--grew half-wild, making masses of glowing color.
Along the walks, where there had paced, a hundred years before, stately
Lewis ladies in brocade and stately Lewis gentlemen in velvet coats, now
tripped an orphan girl, a stranger in her father's home. But she was a
very happy little maid as she roamed about the spacious old garden on
that sunshiny summer day, gathering hollyhocks and zinnias for ladies to
occupy her playhouse in the gnarled roots of an old oak-tree.
Honey-Sweet, by Edna Turpin

A damask rose opened its single petals, the sweetest-scented of all the roses; there were a few strawberries under the wall of the house; by-and-by the pears above enlarged, and the damsons were coated with the bloom. On the tall plum-trees hung the large purplish-red plums: upon shaking the tree, one or two came down with a thud. The branches of the damsons depended so low, looking, as it were, right into the court and pressing the fruit against your very face as you entered, that you could not choose but take some when it was ripe. A blue-painted barrel-churn stood by the door; young Aaron turned it in the morning, while the finches called in the plum-trees, but now and then not all the strength of his sturdy shoulders nor patient hours of turning could 'fetch' the butter, for a witch had been busy.
Round About a Great Estate, by Richard Jefferies

The disappointed candidates consoled themselves by the size of the bouquets which they threw to the heroine at the close of the third act. One was of white roses and red carnations; the other was of pink roses and lilies of the valley. The flowers that she carried when she answered the final curtain-call, curiously enough, were damask roses and mignonette. A minute observer would have noticed that there was a fine damask rose-bush growing in the Cutter's back garden.
Days Off, by Henry Van Dyke

The sweet-brier under the window-sill,
Which the early birds made glad,
And the damask rose by the garden fence
Were all the flowers we had.
I've looked at many a flower since then,
Exotics rich and rare,
That to other eyes were lovelier,
But not to me so fair;
O those roses bright, O those roses bright!
I have twined them with my sister's locks,
That are hid in the dust from sight!
Phoebe Gary